Novel Therapy Uses Radioactive Seeds to Treat Brain Tumors

A diagnosis of cancer is shocking for most people. But a diagnosis of brain cancer may carry additional fear when one considers these facts: no other cancer is as challenging to effectively treat as brain cancer, and the average five-year survival rate for people with malignant brain tumors is about 36%.

Fortunately, the availability of a novel treatment called GammaTile® Therapy is offering hope for people like 68-year-old Jane Finch Hall.

GammaTile Is the New Frontier for Radiation Treatment

Mayfield Brain & Spine’s Vincent DiNapoli, M.D., Ph.D. was the first surgeon in the eastern U.S. to perform surgery on recurrent brain tumors using a new radiation delivery technique called GammaTile Therapy. Now, he’s partnered with Oncology Hematology Care and Jewish Hospital – Mercy Health (where he’s also the director of the Brain Tumor Center) for a new study using GammaTile to treat newly diagnosed primary cancer that’s moved to the brain. DiNapoli explains how the treatment works.

New Advances That Are Changing Brain Cancer Treatment

Precision medicine is revolutionizing cancer treatment. Instead of using the same treatment for the same type of cancer, precision medicine tailors treatment to each individual. Precision medicine—also known as personalized medicine—takes into account someone’s genes, lifestyle and environment to find the most effective course of action for them.

Upstate Introduces GammaTile to Deliver Radiation After Brain Tumor Surgery

Patients with some types of cancerous brain tumors require radiation treatment after they have the tumor removed, to destroy any remaining cancer cells.

Neurosurgeon Harish Babu, MD, PhD, is co-director of Upstate’s brain tumor program and director of minimally invasive neurosurgery.

Now there’s the option to have the tumor removed and replaced by postage stamp-sized radiation sources, in the same operation. It’s called GammaTile Therapy.

IEEE Pulse Feature: Harnessing Another Tool for Treating Brain Cancer

Imagining a future with new life-saving approaches for brain cancer may soon become reality. “I think the holy grail is some kind of treatment that cures a person from a biologic level. If we could cure without radiation at all that would be ideal,” Mohiuddin says. For the thousands of people diagnosed with brain cancer every year, this future can’t come soon enough. Until then, the addition of new tools such as GammaTile offer some hope for living with brain cancer.